Conifer Couples

In my last post, I promised to introduce you to a pair of cute little conifers that I am confident you will want to collect and grow in your own gardens. Now, if you are at all like me, you have become completely enamored with miniature conifers – the ones that are described by the American Conifer Society as growing less than one inch per year. To be honest though, my definition of mini-conifers does expand a bit and includes some “dwarf” cultivars that grow up to around 2-3 inches per year – which is still pretty darned slow-growing and the plants remain very small for a very long time.

The cute couple that am honored to introduce to you this post are both tiny forms of Picea abies, the Norway spruce. Growing three feet per year when young and eventually reaching heights near 200 feet, the Norway spruce is a native forest tree growing in colder regions throughout Europe. An excellent tree—healthy, hardy and vigorous—it has been cultivated far from its native range. There are hundreds of unique mutations which have been discovered, named and collected in gardens for many years. Over the past 50 years, many of these new cultivars, have begun to be propagated by nurseries because of the plants usefulness in contemporary landscapes. As garden spaces have grown smaller, so have many of the plants that are commercially available.

Picea abies ‘Jana’ looks to me like the top of a human head protruding up from the soil.

Dwarf and miniature conifers are perfect plants for use in container gardens, miniature gardens, fairy gardens, railway gardens and rock gardens because they grow slowly and remain small for a great number of years. The selection of plants becoming available to local independent garden centers continues to grow, making it possible to create a garden filled with an exciting collection of these diminutive beauties much more quickly than just 15 or 20 years ago. As more folks are becoming interested in miniature gardens, more of these tiny plants, once only found as rarities in devoted collector’s gardens will become available so that regular folks may enjoy them in their own gardens.

Without any further ado, I introduce to you, ‘Jana’ and ‘Jessy’!

Picea abies ‘Jana’ is a very slow growing, mounding, dense bun with relatively long, rich green needles which radiate outward, encircling each small branch. Annual growth looks to average close to half an inch or just about 1.5 centimeters in length. I do see some random shoots of up to an inch on my plant from time to time, but I tend to snip those few oddballs off to keep my plant tidy. The largest specimen of Jana that I can remember seeing reminded me of the top of a large human head, from just about the eyebrows and the top of the ears, protruding above the ground as if the rest of this unlucky fellow was standing, buried under the soil. Growing at less than one inch per year, you can do the math to estimate the size of your new plant in 10 or 20 years.

Prominent orange-tan buds adorn the already ultra-cute Picea abies ‘Jessy.’

Picea abies ‘Jessy’ appears to me to grow slightly slower than ‘Jana’ with its overall appearance being smaller. Very tiny, dark green, glossy needles cover very small, thin, light colored branches. At the terminal of each small branch is a prominent, orange-tan bud cluster. At first I thought to describe the buds as being large, but upon close inspection I determined that the buds are close to the same size or slightly smaller than that of ‘Jana’. The tiny shoots and needles make the buds appear larger and they really do stand out as a prominent feature on this fascinating little plant.

These two miniature conifers make a delightful pair and may be grown together as part of a miniature garden of any kind. I like seeing these two planted together in miniature theme gardens because although they grow at similar rates, they are very different from one another due to the details of their features. I hope you will give them both a try in your own garden. They are both hardy to Zone 3 and will thrive in full sun with moist, well-drained soil.

I’ll have two more “minis” to share with you next time!

Ed-
Conifer Lover

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2 thoughts on “Conifer Couples

  1. Great question, David. I inquired about that before I published this post. Although these are available in small quantities, many have been sold for shipment throughout the country either this fall or next spring. When I checked, they still had some available to sell.

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